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Archive for 2005

Schoolgirls : Tomoko Sawada

月曜日, 11月 14th, 2005

School Days-A*

Tomoko Sawada「Schoolgirls—School Days + cover/Face」

Decemer 8 to 24, 2005
Reception: December 8, PM5-7
Gallery hours: AM11:00-PM7:00
Closed on Sundays and National holidays

Press Release

We are pleased to announce Tomoko Sawada’s solo exhibition, Schoolgirls-School Days + cover/Face.
Tomoko Sawada’s theme is the interrelation between one’s appearance and inner self. She produces numerous personalities by manipulating her self-portrait.

At “Schoolgirls”, Sawada will show two series: “School Days” and “cover/Face”. For the series School days, there are 10 classroom memorial photographs, which look like ordinary photos you may have as a memory of your high-school period. But, if you look at them closely you will realize that Sawada herself performs all the students and teachers. And “cover/Face”, also her self-portraits, deals with fashion trends among Japanese teenage girls.
Through the series, Sawada explores the possibilities of one’s persona with her self-portraits.
Tomoko Sawada lives and works in Kobe, Japan. She was awarded The Twentieth Annual ICP Infinity Award for Young Photographers and Kimura Ihei Memorial Photography Award in 2004. For further information, click here

澤田知子展「Schoolgirls—School Days + cover/Face」

月曜日, 11月 14th, 2005

School Days-A*

澤田知子展「Schoolgirls—School Days + cover/Face」

2005年12月8日(木)〜12月24日(土)

澤田は1977年神戸生まれ。2000年成安造形大学の卒業制作で撮影した「ID400」がキャノン「写真新世紀」特別賞を受賞。様々な人物に扮したお見合い写真「OMIAI」、ガングロギャルに扮した「cover」、いろいろな職業人に扮した「Costume」、女子高のクラス写真を引用して制作した「School Days」など次々と作品を発表。 2004年木村伊兵衛賞を受賞。今年3月開幕の「愛・地球博2005」公式アートプログラム「幸福のかたち」では、新作「FACE」を展示。その他、ニューヨーク、ロンドン、ベルギー、ウィーンなど世界各国で展覧会をおこなっている。
 今回は”Schoolgirls”をテーマにSchool Daysの全シリーズとcover/Faceシリーズを織り交ぜて展開。

本展についての作家コメント

「Schoolgirls—School Days + cover/Face」

 今年の初めに発表した新作”School Days“は、今まで「外見と内面の関係」をテーマに制作してきた中で、様々に変装を繰り返し、今も継続している制作スタイルがどうして生まれてきたものなのかを自分自身知ることができるかもしれないという気持ちと、もしかしたら中学、高校と女子校だったことも今のテーマに至った要因のひとつかもしれないという考えから作りました。
 実はこの作品をはじめに思いついたのは2002年のことで、この年に私はCoverを制作、発表しましたが、この頃に”School Days”は既に頭の中でイメージが出来上がっていました。その”Cover”のシリーズと一緒に“School Days”を女子学生というテーマでまとめるのがこの度の個展“Schoolgirls”です。2002年以降、関西で発表することのなかったコギャルを引用した”cover”より“Cover/Face”シリーズを未発表のイメージも含めて新たな形で展示致します。
私の頭の中で同時にイメージが生まれた2シリーズの作品をぜひご覧下さい。

澤田知子

スペシャルエディション予約受付中

Schoolgirls展を記念したエディションを発表致します。

Vermeer's Room : Yasumasa Morimura

火曜日, 6月 14th, 2005

vermeer_yellow*

Yasumasa Morimura Vermeer’s Room

July 2-July 30, 2005

press release

MEM presents Vermeer’s Room, an exhibition of installation work by Yasumasa Morimura, which pays an homage to Johannes Vermeer, Dutch master in the 17th century. The whole project began with a painting titled The Art of Painting by Vermeer, which was exhibited last year in Japan as part of collection of Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna
Morimura recreated the actual room in the original painting including furniture and props in his own manner. He used computer analysis to verify the exact dimension of the room, locations of props and sizes of persons. He eventually produced a piece of canvas work based on The Art of Painting by Vermeer imposing himself as the painter and the model at the same time.
Related photographs and a video work will be shown in the exhibition. In Vermeer’s Room, you can experience an imaginary Vermeer’s room created by Morimura.
For further information and images: tel.06-6231-0337 e-mail

Installation View

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Press

Courtesy Art Asia Pacific magazine

Exclusive
Out of the Corner of a Small Room, Painting Develops

In a new installation piece displayed at MEM, Osaka, in July 2005, Morimura Yasumasa recreated in three-dimensional exactitude the room depicted in Johannes Vermeer’s masterwork, The Art of Painting (c. 1662-68). Based, however, not on the concept of architectural mimicry or deference to one’s forbears, but instead on the wish to welcome guests into his own satellite atelier, Morimura explains the work as being informed by Vermeer, yet centered on the Japanese tradition of shitsurae, or the careful placement of objects in an intimate setting so as to enhance the experience of one’s guests engaged in a formal tea ceremony. Under such a scenario, the meticulously arranged ikebana floral displays, revered tea implements, sweeping garden views and laboriously chosen hanging scroll of the teahouse are replaced with the trappings of The Art of Painting, yet served up with Morimura’s signature twist. Laden with hidden meanings and veiled references, Vermeer’s Room (2005) can best be viewed as an iconographic study of the fine art of trickery and well-intentioned deceit.

At first glance, the installation’s layout appears to be a perfect replica of Vermeer’s studio where so many of his paintings were composed: pure light seeps in from the window to the left; the signature black and white checkered floor draws the eye; the heavy wooden furniture placed exactly where it should be. Yet, upon closer inspection, the entire scene starts to unravel as Morimura’s playful stunts become apparent. The spatial arrangement of the room and the abundance of photographs of the same interior that line the wall allow for the piece to exist on a number of planes, some physical, others philosophical. These attendant portraits and a framed video work that sits on a chair just in front of the large table in the room are at times populated by various incarnations of Morimura playing the two key roles in the original painting: Vermeer himself, and a model portraying Clio, the muse of history. Many of the photographic works depicting the room, however, are devoid of Morimura, thus leading the viewer to wonder what further tricks he may be concocting offstage. And we do see the constructed nature of these tricks in the key to the series, Vermeer: The Positions of the Three (2004), a behind-the-scenes view of the set for Vermeer Study featuring Morimura facing the camera in Vermeer’s clothing and standing in the same position as the camera obscura that Vermeer used to spatially arrange the layout of the original painting.

The clues to the work’s visual puns are hidden in the tomes of art history, and it is only with a careful iconographic study of the original Vermeer that one begins to understand Morimura’s master plan. For, itself rich in iconographic reference, The Art of Painting is first and foremost an allegorical tale about fame, power, patronage and painting that was conceived of in a 17th-century Netherlands fully entranced by all of these things and more. For example, Vermeer depicts Clio wearing a wreath of laurel on her head and holding a trumpet and a thick portfolio, one in either hand. The trumpet is a sign of fame; the book a reference to arts and letters; the combination, a reference to the fame bestowed on an artist thanks to literary acumen or aesthetic skill. So, too, is the black and white marble floor a nod to the wealth of the era, although it is quite likely that Vermeer’s studio did not have such a floor, and that the artist was simply intrigued by the pattern as an artistic challenge or a reference to the wealthy arts patrons whom he was hoping to attract. The large map hanging on the back wall of the room depicts the 17 unified districts of Holland under former Hapsburg rule; the Latin phrase at the top makes timely reference to warfare and political power. Lastly, the scattered drawings and plaster cast of a head atop the table make reference not only to the value of study models in painting, but also to the import of history and the celebration of its heroes through the, then, vogue display of death masks, bust portraiture and graphic representations of the important politicians and philosophers of world history.

Vermeer’s careful iconography is mirrored askew in Morimura’s work and is best viewed in the main focal point of the installation, the large portrait Vermeer Study: A Great Story Out of the Corner of a Small Room (2004), that hangs on the back wall of the installation. The replacement of the map from The Art of Painting with this photograph can thus be seen as a device to place artistic prowess on the same level as military might and political power. Within this work, and amongst the real-life arrangement of its props and remains scattered around the room, Morimura carefully references Vermeer’s iconographic lexicon, while at the same time establishing his own. Here, for example, we still find Clio bedecked with a (fresh) laurel wreath and holding an (actual) brass trumpet and a thick historical atlas, but in Morimura’s world, the role is not played by a model, but by the artist himself, carefully “made up” in all aspects of the word to resemble the Clio of the original. The artist at the easel, too, is played by Morimura, this time in the role of Vermeer himself; the work thus becomes a multilayered self-portrait of the artist painting a portrait of his own, albeit in drag, self-portrait.

The placement of well-planned puns does not end with Clio, however. In Vermeer’s Room, the various objects that inhabited the top of the table in Vermeer’s work are replaced by items significant to the history of Morimura’scareer as an artist. The plaster bust is there but is, in fact, a cast of Morimura’s visage and perhaps a conscious act of forced inclusion into the annals of art history. The drawings and sketches that cover the top of Morimura’s table are works that he drafted as a high school student and can thus be read as precursor hints that shed light on the development of his work. In addition to the tattered rags and tubes of paint—incredibly important tools of the art trade—that litter the table, there is also to be found the most indispensable tool of Morimura’s art making: his beloved camera. It is here that his most profound trickery—that of placing the value of photography over that of painting—is performed.

And so it is through the lens of Morimura’s camera that Vermeer Study is produced, a photograph in painting’s clothing. Thought of in these terms—“dressing” a room so as to replicate a given space (or architectural drag, if you will)—Morimura’s attention to detail is seen not only in the folds and drapes of the figures’ clothing, but also in the hand-painted curtain that hangs before much of the upper-left quadrant of the work. It is upon this curtain that Morimura’s “art of painting” plays out in his attempts to mimic the fine tapestries depicted in The Art of Painting’s drapes. So, too, does it play out in the laurel wreath depicted on the canvas left behind in the installation, a balancing rod looming upon its surface as if levitating. But perhaps most important to the overall understanding of all of the works is the painted map that hangs at the back of the small room in Vermeer Study.

Surprisingly not a depiction of the 17 districts of Holland, Morimura’s map is instead that of the world. Its roughly etched lines mimic that of the map in the Vermeer, and along the bottom, small flags of each nation of the world are illustrated. A female figure in the upper right corner holds the coats of arms of the north and south regions of the Netherlands, one in each hand; she is the emblem of “unity and separation,” just as she is in the Vermeer, although here her role is that of the mediator between photography and painting, not North and South. Returning to the Latin heading of the map in The Art of Painting, the text reads (in translation): “The tremendous wars waged in these countries in bygone days, and still waged in these days, bear sufficient witness to the whole wide world of the great strength, power, and wealth of these very countries.” Turning to the text on Morimura’s map, a very different message—this time in Dutch—is to be found. It says (in translation): “A Great Story Out of the Corner of a Small Room.” And it is indeed from the installation’s very small room—along with its trappings and the photographic and video depictions that simultaneously interpret and inhabit it—that a most interesting story revolving around artistic fame, power, politics and painting develops, much akin to the same story spun by Vermeer nearly 400 years ago, and more directly, in the same vein as Morimura’s photographic output.

- Eric C. Shiner

Works&Press

森村泰昌展「フェルメールの部屋」

火曜日, 6月 14th, 2005

vermeer_yellow*

森村泰昌展「フェルメールの部屋」
〜大きな物語は、小さな部屋の片隅に現れる〜

2005年7月2日(土)ー7月30日(土)

press release

17世紀オランダ絵画の巨匠ヨハネス・フェルメールが制作した数少ない絵画作品は、近年日本でも公開される機会が多くなり、来日のたびに話題を呼んでいます。森村は、昨年日本で公開されたウィーン美術史美術館収蔵の「画家のアトリエ(絵画芸術)」をモチーフに、モリムラ版フェルメール作品を制作。その制作の秘密を独自の視点で解き明かしました。
今回は関連のモリムラ版フェルメール作品群を一同に展示することでプロジェクトの全貌にせまります。
展示内容は、平面作品と映像作品、実際の撮影で使用された小道具や家具など。画廊空間全体に改装がなされ、三百年前のフェルメールの部屋にトリップします。

Installation View

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Press

Courtesy Art Asia Pacific magazine

Exclusive
Out of the Corner of a Small Room, Painting Develops

In a new installation piece displayed at MEM, Osaka, in July 2005, Morimura Yasumasa recreated in three-dimensional exactitude the room depicted in Johannes Vermeer’s masterwork, The Art of Painting (c. 1662-68). Based, however, not on the concept of architectural mimicry or deference to one’s forbears, but instead on the wish to welcome guests into his own satellite atelier, Morimura explains the work as being informed by Vermeer, yet centered on the Japanese tradition of shitsurae, or the careful placement of objects in an intimate setting so as to enhance the experience of one’s guests engaged in a formal tea ceremony. Under such a scenario, the meticulously arranged ikebana floral displays, revered tea implements, sweeping garden views and laboriously chosen hanging scroll of the teahouse are replaced with the trappings of The Art of Painting, yet served up with Morimura’s signature twist. Laden with hidden meanings and veiled references, Vermeer’s Room (2005) can best be viewed as an iconographic study of the fine art of trickery and well-intentioned deceit.

At first glance, the installation’s layout appears to be a perfect replica of Vermeer’s studio where so many of his paintings were composed: pure light seeps in from the window to the left; the signature black and white checkered floor draws the eye; the heavy wooden furniture placed exactly where it should be. Yet, upon closer inspection, the entire scene starts to unravel as Morimura’s playful stunts become apparent. The spatial arrangement of the room and the abundance of photographs of the same interior that line the wall allow for the piece to exist on a number of planes, some physical, others philosophical. These attendant portraits and a framed video work that sits on a chair just in front of the large table in the room are at times populated by various incarnations of Morimura playing the two key roles in the original painting: Vermeer himself, and a model portraying Clio, the muse of history. Many of the photographic works depicting the room, however, are devoid of Morimura, thus leading the viewer to wonder what further tricks he may be concocting offstage. And we do see the constructed nature of these tricks in the key to the series, Vermeer: The Positions of the Three (2004), a behind-the-scenes view of the set for Vermeer Study featuring Morimura facing the camera in Vermeer’s clothing and standing in the same position as the camera obscura that Vermeer used to spatially arrange the layout of the original painting.

The clues to the work’s visual puns are hidden in the tomes of art history, and it is only with a careful iconographic study of the original Vermeer that one begins to understand Morimura’s master plan. For, itself rich in iconographic reference, The Art of Painting is first and foremost an allegorical tale about fame, power, patronage and painting that was conceived of in a 17th-century Netherlands fully entranced by all of these things and more. For example, Vermeer depicts Clio wearing a wreath of laurel on her head and holding a trumpet and a thick portfolio, one in either hand. The trumpet is a sign of fame; the book a reference to arts and letters; the combination, a reference to the fame bestowed on an artist thanks to literary acumen or aesthetic skill. So, too, is the black and white marble floor a nod to the wealth of the era, although it is quite likely that Vermeer’s studio did not have such a floor, and that the artist was simply intrigued by the pattern as an artistic challenge or a reference to the wealthy arts patrons whom he was hoping to attract. The large map hanging on the back wall of the room depicts the 17 unified districts of Holland under former Hapsburg rule; the Latin phrase at the top makes timely reference to warfare and political power. Lastly, the scattered drawings and plaster cast of a head atop the table make reference not only to the value of study models in painting, but also to the import of history and the celebration of its heroes through the, then, vogue display of death masks, bust portraiture and graphic representations of the important politicians and philosophers of world history.

Vermeer’s careful iconography is mirrored askew in Morimura’s work and is best viewed in the main focal point of the installation, the large portrait Vermeer Study: A Great Story Out of the Corner of a Small Room (2004), that hangs on the back wall of the installation. The replacement of the map from The Art of Painting with this photograph can thus be seen as a device to place artistic prowess on the same level as military might and political power. Within this work, and amongst the real-life arrangement of its props and remains scattered around the room, Morimura carefully references Vermeer’s iconographic lexicon, while at the same time establishing his own. Here, for example, we still find Clio bedecked with a (fresh) laurel wreath and holding an (actual) brass trumpet and a thick historical atlas, but in Morimura’s world, the role is not played by a model, but by the artist himself, carefully “made up” in all aspects of the word to resemble the Clio of the original. The artist at the easel, too, is played by Morimura, this time in the role of Vermeer himself; the work thus becomes a multilayered self-portrait of the artist painting a portrait of his own, albeit in drag, self-portrait.

The placement of well-planned puns does not end with Clio, however. In Vermeer’s Room, the various objects that inhabited the top of the table in Vermeer’s work are replaced by items significant to the history of Morimura’scareer as an artist. The plaster bust is there but is, in fact, a cast of Morimura’s visage and perhaps a conscious act of forced inclusion into the annals of art history. The drawings and sketches that cover the top of Morimura’s table are works that he drafted as a high school student and can thus be read as precursor hints that shed light on the development of his work. In addition to the tattered rags and tubes of paint—incredibly important tools of the art trade—that litter the table, there is also to be found the most indispensable tool of Morimura’s art making: his beloved camera. It is here that his most profound trickery—that of placing the value of photography over that of painting—is performed.

And so it is through the lens of Morimura’s camera that Vermeer Study is produced, a photograph in painting’s clothing. Thought of in these terms—“dressing” a room so as to replicate a given space (or architectural drag, if you will)—Morimura’s attention to detail is seen not only in the folds and drapes of the figures’ clothing, but also in the hand-painted curtain that hangs before much of the upper-left quadrant of the work. It is upon this curtain that Morimura’s “art of painting” plays out in his attempts to mimic the fine tapestries depicted in The Art of Painting’s drapes. So, too, does it play out in the laurel wreath depicted on the canvas left behind in the installation, a balancing rod looming upon its surface as if levitating. But perhaps most important to the overall understanding of all of the works is the painted map that hangs at the back of the small room in Vermeer Study.

Surprisingly not a depiction of the 17 districts of Holland, Morimura’s map is instead that of the world. Its roughly etched lines mimic that of the map in the Vermeer, and along the bottom, small flags of each nation of the world are illustrated. A female figure in the upper right corner holds the coats of arms of the north and south regions of the Netherlands, one in each hand; she is the emblem of “unity and separation,” just as she is in the Vermeer, although here her role is that of the mediator between photography and painting, not North and South. Returning to the Latin heading of the map in The Art of Painting, the text reads (in translation): “The tremendous wars waged in these countries in bygone days, and still waged in these days, bear sufficient witness to the whole wide world of the great strength, power, and wealth of these very countries.” Turning to the text on Morimura’s map, a very different message—this time in Dutch—is to be found. It says (in translation): “A Great Story Out of the Corner of a Small Room.” And it is indeed from the installation’s very small room—along with its trappings and the photographic and video depictions that simultaneously interpret and inhabit it—that a most interesting story revolving around artistic fame, power, politics and painting develops, much akin to the same story spun by Vermeer nearly 400 years ago, and more directly, in the same vein as Morimura’s photographic output.

- Eric C. Shiner

top

Barco Negro on a table : Yasumasa Morimura

火曜日, 3月 15th, 2005

m_web_bc

Yasumasa Morimura
“Barco Negro on the table”

March 28-April 30, 2003

Early still-life photographs from the 1980s.

press release

MEM presents the exhibition “Barco Negro on a Table” showing early photographic works by Yasumasa Morimura created between 1984-1985. Forty-nine gelatin-silver prints were displayed in the show that had not been previously exhibited save for six photographs from the “City on the Table” series and three photos from the “Swimming Person” series that were shown in a group show in Osaka in 1984. Some additional images included in the exhibition were previously reproduced in publications including the “Tower in the Forest” series that was used for invitation cards for Comme des Garcons in the 90s. All photographs were newly printed especially for this exhibition.
The images in the photographs were carefully constructed on a table in Morimura’s studio using various kinds of objects including tableware, clothes and original small sculptures. It is interesting that Morimura, an artist whose works are highly esteemed as post-modern art, produced a group of constructed photographs in the manner of Modernism, comparable to works from the Bauhaus or Russian Constructivist schools.

Background of the early photography of Morimura:
After leaving the Kyoto University of the Arts in 1975, Yasumasa Morimura worked as an assistant to Ernest Sato, professor of Graduate Studies of Art, at the University from 1980 to 1989. Sato, a former photojournalist who had worked for Life magazine, delivered unique lectures on modernist photographers in the 20th century starting with Henri Cartier-Bresson.

Morimura says, “…This is not to say he was only concerned with photography. Instead, he used examples of photography in the context of the whole of 20th century art, and these became the base from which he expounded on the aesthetics of Modernism…”(’Y.Earnest Satow, selected photographs’, 2000, p43) Morimura thus became fascinated by ‘the aesthetics of Modernism’ through Sato’s lectures on the practical skills of photography that included numerous examples of works by modernist photographers.
The group of photography from “Barco Negro on a Table” testifies to the fact that Morimura thoroughly studied modernist photography of the 20th century. He established his own style in his photography by appropriating the structure of modernist works. One of the characteristics in these photographs is that the objects made by Morimura, including a tower made from dice, cut out letters, and a painted board, are used carefully in the images. Although the artist has created numerous objects and small sculptures over the course of his career, he has not included all of them in his photographs.
After creating still-life photographs for a group exhibition in 1984, Morimura noted that he “…felt tired of getting along with ‘art trends’ in the middle of the 80s… As compared with light colored prints by Pop artists and posters in the Marie Laurencin style, which are regarded as suitable for contemporary interior design, the aggressively colored paintings by Van Gogh and the provincial Van Gogh himself seemed to be a symbol of the negative world. Then, I regarded anything related to this ‘Van Gogh world’ as my family and wanted to bark at the world with them…”(from ‘Making of Artist M’, 1998, Chikuma-Shobo)
In 1985, Morimura produced “Portrait (Van Gogh)” appropriating the image of Van Gogh’s famous self-portrait. The work was a milestone in his output that drastically changed the sheer direction of his work. This work marks the beginning of Morimura’s ‘Daughter of Art History’ period that drew the attention of curators and critics in the Western world. Morimura continued to appropriate images from major paintings by western masters such as Vel?quez, Rambrandt, Goya, Cezanne and Manet. He quite literally inserted himself into these paintings, performing not only the persons included within, but also several non-human objects as well.

Installation View

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Works

「IBARAKITAHAMA〜暮らしの美間」

月曜日, 2月 14th, 2005

araibldg
hashimotokomuten

「IBARAKITAHAMA〜暮らしの美間」

赤松玉女 秋吉風人 井野敬裕 遠藤裕美子 加藤豪 北辻良央
服部滋樹 原田リョータ 藤本由紀夫 松井智惠 intext

2005年3月5日〜31日
open: 11:00-19:00
closed: 日曜・祝日(3/20-21は開廊)
会場:MEM 画廊橋本工務点

詳細/関連企画

IBARAKITAHAMA〜暮らしの美間(みま)〜

2005年3月5日(土)〜31日(木)

会場:画廊橋本工務点(地図) MEM(地図)

オープニングレセプション:3月5日(土)17:00より MEMにて
クロージングレセプション:3月31日(木)17:00より 画廊橋本工務点にて

出品作家:
橋本工務点(茨木会場):赤松玉女 秋吉風人 井野敬裕 加藤豪 北辻良央 松井智惠 
MEM(北浜会場): 遠藤裕美子 服部滋樹 原田リョータ intext
空間コーディネイト:橋本健二

OPEN:11:00-19:00
休廊:日曜・祝日(3/20-21は開廊)

主催:くらしの中の美術展実行委員会
大阪楽座事業認定事業
協力:新井真一、新井株式会社、MAXRAY、橋本工務店、DADO、ヨハン・コシェック、Gallery HAM、五感、橋本健二建築事務所、MEM INC.

【関連企画】
■ 3月20日(日)〜21日(月・祝日)
藤本由紀夫「茨木の耳・北浜の耳」
会場:橋本邸、新井ビル(当日MEM、画廊橋本工務店両会場で詳細ご案内致します)会期中2日限定で藤本作品を設置、作品を体験しながら茨木〜北浜間を回遊していただきます。個性的な設計の橋本邸も公開。
■ 3月21日(祝日) シンポジウム「美と用の間」
パネラー:藤本由紀夫・服部滋樹・橋本健二
会場:新井ビル1F
受付開始午後1時30分 開演2時(終了予定午後4時)定員50名(満席により締切ました)
芸術家藤本氏、家具やインテリアのプロデュースを手がけるgraf主宰の服部氏、そして建築家橋本氏。各分野で活躍する3氏による、生活・芸術・デザインをめぐる対話。

【企画内容】  本企画は茨木にある明治時代の女学校の校舎を使用した橋本健二建築事務所の空間と、大阪市内の証券街北浜に大正時代に建てられた洋風建築の新井ビル4階に位置するMEMという二つの対照的な場所で催されます。
  新井ビルは大正11年、建築家河合浩蔵氏の設計で当初銀行のビルとして建てられた後、戦争を経てさまざまな歴史的変遷を通過してきました。エレベーターは戦時中の金属回収で供出されたままになっており、その空間は現在吹き抜けの美しい螺旋階段になっています。
現在新井ビルは日本建築学会からの保存の要請もあり、有形登録文化財に認定されています。
 一方橋本建築事務所の建物はかつて学校として使われましたが、現在の場所に移築され、倉庫と画廊橋本工務店、建築事務所に使われています。
 作品を両会場ギャラリースペースおよび建物の他の空間に設置すると同時に、建物の歴史にまつわる家具類や、置物等を橋本氏のコーディネイトで構成します。
 いくつかの時代を生きた建物空間と人間が交差する場所で見え隠れする美間を探し求める試みです。
 尚本展は大阪府の歴史的建築物へ対する助成プログラム「楽座事業」の認定事業になっています。

会場地図 橋本工務点

画廊橋本工務点(橋本健二建築事務所)

茨木市春日3-13-9 TEL0726-23-6767
JR茨木駅(JR大阪駅より15分)より徒歩10分。阪急茨木市駅からは徒歩20分
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藤本由紀夫、森村泰昌「モナ・リザとトランプが与えられたとせよ」

金曜日, 1月 14th, 2005

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藤本由紀夫、森村泰昌「モナ・リザとトランプが与えられたとせよ」

2005年2月13日 完全予約制時間指定

本儀式は2004年11月1日〜12月18日に当画廊にて開催された『「これはデュシャンではない」、ですか。』展のクロージングイヴェントとして行われた。

儀式風景

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Exhibition

「これはデュシャンではない」、ですか。